Zhu Family Biluochun

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Biluochun 1.jpg
Biluochun 7.jpg
sale

Zhu Family Biluochun

from 14.00

One of the most celebrated green teas in China. Purest spring all year long. Saline, floral, and fruity with a very thick mouth feel. And now on sale!

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Picked in early March before the Qingming Festival (the 15th day after the Spring Equinox, i.e., April 4 or 5), this tea is designed to capture the very essence of spring (chun). Biluochun (literally “green spring snails”) gets its name from its spiral shape. Legend has it that this shape originated during a severe rainstorm some time in the 14th century, when a tea picker ran out of space in her basket and protected the delicate, just plucked leaves and buds from the rain by placing them in her shirt between her breasts. Her body warmth and shape caused the tea to release a startlingly exquisite aroma (hence the original name, Xiasharenxiang or “scary fragrance”) and to curl as the tiny spring buds found their way into their surrounding leaves. Today this shape is achieved through a special warm kneading process that is performed on a wok immediately after the buds and leaves have been plucked and sorted. The best tea masters know how to manipulate temperature and their own body movements to bring out the silver-white color, fuzzy texture, and powerful aroma of the lovely, downy spring buds. You can smell a Biluochun village from miles away,

This particular version is very high grade and was sourced directly from the Zhu Family in Luxiang Village at the base of Dongshan in the Lake Tai region of Jiangsu Province — the true origin of this style of tea. According to the Zhu Family, the slightly fruity flavor of their tea derives from the yang mei fruit trees with which the roots of the village’s tea plants share subsoil. Biluochun is a touch fussy, so pay close attention to how you brew it. When you get it just right, it is arguably the world's greatest green tea.

Instructions:

Method 1 (Grandpa style): 4g or 2 tbsp. tea, 10 oz. tall glass, 176° water, enjoy directly from cup in which tea is steeping, add more hot water as you wish (and definitely once you are down to about a quarter of the liquid).

Method 2 (Gong fu style): 4g or 2 tbsp. tea, 6-8 oz. teapot or gaiwan, 176° water, 45 sec. Steep 4-5 times, adding 5-10 seconds each time.

See our Temperature Guide for help.